Category "Pediatrics"

5Nov2021

One of the hardest calls to make as a parent is figuring out when to call your child’s doctor. While it’s always a good idea to play it safe, many parents worry that they might end up bringing their children into the office for something that could have more easily been handled at home. If you’re trying to make such a decision, you’ll want to keep a few factors in mind.

Important Factors to Consider

The first thing to think about, of course, is the significance of what you are dealing with. A fever of below one hundred degrees, for example, probably isn’t worth going to the doctor for, nor is a small scrape or bruise. On the other hand, a problem that seems bigger – a higher, longer-duration fever or a significant injury – should almost automatically warrant a visit to the doctor’s office.

It’s also worth thinking about your child’s general health. There is a certain degree of normality for any given child when it comes to how he or she reacts to being sick, and you need to keep that in mind. It might be worth bringing a child in for what might be a low fever if he or she typically runs cool, for example, or you might not want to bring in a child who complains about a stomach ache if he or she is typically prone to those problems (and, of course, other issues have already been ruled out by your doctor).

Finally, try to remember that it’s always worth bringing your child in to see his or her doctor if you feel like something is just not right. While it’s not fair to say that a parent’s intuition is always going to pay off, you will have a greater peace of mind if you take your child in to see a doctor when you feel like doing so is appropriate. The worst you can find out is that your child didn’t need to come into the office, so the true risk of going in is relatively low compared to the risk of staying at home out of fear that you are over-reacting.

15Oct2021

As the seasons change from summer to autumn, many children begin to get the first sniffles of the year. While you might have easily been able to write this off in the past, the continued prevalence of COVID-19 has made even what might have once been an inconsequential cough seem overly threatening. As such, it’s incredibly important to know how to deal with something like the common cold in times of more heightened scrutiny.

Understanding the Symptoms

The first and perhaps most important thing you’ll need to know how to do is to separate out symptoms of the common cold from COVID symptoms. While some of the symptoms, like a cough or even a mild fever, might be present in both, there are other symptoms that are relatively unique to COVID. For example, any loss of a child’s sense of smell or taste is usually a good sign that a test is needed, as are stomach problems like diarrhea. Respiratory issues are also an issue, as you’ll want to seek care if your child is having trouble breathing even if they aren’t positive for COVID-19.

It’s also generally a better idea to be safe than to be sorry. If you think that your child’s cold is more than just a cold, keep them home even if they don’t seem to have serious symptoms. If the symptoms persist or get worse, call your pediatrician to get guidance. In many cases, your pediatrician will suggest that you get your child tested.

One of the toughest things to deal with is the fact that the common cold is just as likely to occur as it ever was. Unfortunately, this means that you’re going to have to deal with many false alarms during this cold and flu season, but that’s just the nature of the world today. As long as you’re careful and consult with your doctor as necessary, you can help to safeguard your child’s health.

8Oct2021

If you’ve ever spent time watching television, you’ve almost certainly come across ads that ask you to talk to your doctor about some type of medication. While this might be a tough thing to do for the average person, it can feel even more challenging if you are doing so on behalf of your child. Luckily, it’s usually simple to talk to your pediatrician about your concerns.

The Important Factors to Discuss with Pediatricians

It’s always best to go into a conversation about medication with a pediatrician with the goal of solving a problem rather than talking about a specific medication. If you’ve noticed a drug that is advertised to help your child with a particular type of illness, for example, the best way to start the conversation with your doctor is to talk about how you can better manage that illness. Talking about medication is usually a logical follow-up question to that.

You may also want to spend some time doing some research on your own before you talk to your doctor. While pediatricians do a great deal of research on their own, being able to bring up specific concerns or points of interest can be a great way to help your doctor get a bit more information about your child’s needs. The more you’re able to bring to the table in this conversation, the better.

Don’t be afraid to talk to your child’s pediatrician if you have concerns about medication. You may be able to not only get more information about the medication in question, but you may also be able to work with your pediatrician to find a way to better manage your child’s condition. In addition, if you’re willing to start the conversation, your pediatrician may be able to find a suitable course of action that can help your child to live a better life regardless of what they end up being prescribed.

29Sep2021

A good diet is incredibly important for growing children. It ensures that they’re not only able to grow, but that they also receive the fuel that they need to meet the challenges of growing up. While you can certainly make dining decisions for your children when they are very young, things become more complex as they get older. As such, it’s essential to start talking to your children about making healthy eating choices.

Starting Healthy Eating Habits as Children

First and foremost, it’s important to remember that healthy eating isn’t about how someone looks. Don’t bring up issues like weight with your child when you talk about eating healthy. Instead, focus on his or her health as it relates to how he or she eats. With younger children, it might be essential to talk about strong bones or a healthy heart. With older children, though, it might be best to talk about how they feel after they eat certain things.

Above all else, this process is about helping your child to understand that he or she will have to make choices. Don’t talk about completely eliminating desserts or going on diets; instead, talk to your child about how it’s important to practice moderation with certain kinds of treats. Helping your child to understand that eating healthy doesn’t mean giving up the things he or she loves can be a great way to help make the lesson stick.

Don’t forget to involve your child in helping to make healthy meal choices. For example, let your child help the family’s shopping list and discuss why you choose certain items instead of others. If you can get your child involved with his or her own diet early on, he or she will find it much easier to eat healthy when he or she is out on his or her own. The groundwork you lay now can lead to a healthier future for your child.

24Sep2021

COVID-19 continues to be an ongoing issue across the world, with vaccination becoming a hot topic among many groups. As a parent, you do owe it to your child to have a frank discussion about what the vaccine may mean for him or her, and you’ll need to be able to answer any questions that your child may have. Fortunately, doing so is really a matter of being able to find the correct information.

Providing Your Child with Valuable Information

The beginning of your discussion should always start with a frank discussion of what the vaccine is and is not. If you’re not sure about the definition of a vaccine, it’s absolutely fine to look it up and learn a bit more yourself. From there, you can explain to your child that the vaccine is much like those he or she already received for school – not a cure for an illness, but rather protection from contracting the illness itself. You can talk to your child about the risks that are still present even if he or she is vaccinated and, if appropriate, what you consider the risks of vaccination might be.

It’s vital that you present accurate information to your child, so use this time to work together. Ignore social media and stick to well-regarded, peer-reviewed journals or to public health websites that break down the information from those sources. This will not only help your child learn a bit more about the vaccination process but also about how to look up credible sources for health information in the future.

Don’t think that you have to do this all alone, though. You can and should involve your child’s pediatrician in this discussion. Not only will this allow you to bring a more authoritative source into the conversation, but it will also give you a chance to ask the questions to which you might not be able to find satisfying answers online.