Posts Tagged "Parents"

4Jun2022

It is not uncommon for children to feel scared or anxious before their doctor’s appointment. The fear of shots, a new pediatrician, or the unknown is a lot for a child.

You may be looking for a way to prepare your child for the appointment, but you want to ensure you do not make them feel worse. The following guide features tips on what to do and what not to do when preparing your child for the pediatrician.

What To Do When Preparing Your Child For The Pediatrician

The following tips can help you prepare your child for the pediatrician without escalating the situation.

Consider The Timing

Scheduling their appointment at the wrong time is a recipe for disaster, even if they are not afraid of the pediatrician. You should never schedule their appointment during mealtime or nap time, or you may wind up with a cranky, fussy child.

Talk To Your Child

Once you schedule the appointment, talk to your child about it to address any questions or concerns. Your child needs comfort and reassurance about the appointment, but they also need to know their feelings are valid.

Use Simple Words

Use simple words when discussing the appointment with your child. Using the wrong words or phrases may increase their anxiety. For example, let them know the pediatrician is going to see how much they have grown.

What Not To Do When Preparing Your Child For The Pediatrician

There are certain things you should not do when preparing your child for the pediatrician. The following actions can make the situation worse for you and your child.

Dismiss Their Feelings

You should never dismiss your child’s feelings when talking to them about the appointment. Listen to what your child has to say, and let them know you will be by their side the whole time.

Use Scary Words

Using scary words is a sure way to make your child feel scared or anxious about the appointment. Avoid any words or phrases related to the equipment or procedure, especially shots.

Lie About The Appointment

Do not surprise your child with the appointment at the last minute, and do not lie about where you are going on the day of the appointment. You also want to avoid lying about whether your child needs a shot.

If you are looking for a caring, professional pediatrician for your child, look no further than Kids 1st Pediatrics. Schedule an appointment for your child by visiting kids1stpediatrics.net.

24Sep2021

COVID-19 continues to be an ongoing issue across the world, with vaccination becoming a hot topic among many groups. As a parent, you do owe it to your child to have a frank discussion about what the vaccine may mean for him or her, and you’ll need to be able to answer any questions that your child may have. Fortunately, doing so is really a matter of being able to find the correct information.

Providing Your Child with Valuable Information

The beginning of your discussion should always start with a frank discussion of what the vaccine is and is not. If you’re not sure about the definition of a vaccine, it’s absolutely fine to look it up and learn a bit more yourself. From there, you can explain to your child that the vaccine is much like those he or she already received for school – not a cure for an illness, but rather protection from contracting the illness itself. You can talk to your child about the risks that are still present even if he or she is vaccinated and, if appropriate, what you consider the risks of vaccination might be.

It’s vital that you present accurate information to your child, so use this time to work together. Ignore social media and stick to well-regarded, peer-reviewed journals or to public health websites that break down the information from those sources. This will not only help your child learn a bit more about the vaccination process but also about how to look up credible sources for health information in the future.

Don’t think that you have to do this all alone, though. You can and should involve your child’s pediatrician in this discussion. Not only will this allow you to bring a more authoritative source into the conversation, but it will also give you a chance to ask the questions to which you might not be able to find satisfying answers online.

19Jul2021

Parents today have access to more medical information than ever before. While many can use this to educate themselves, the truth is that there often seems to be just as much misinformation out there as there is valid information. As a parent, it’s your duty to not only do your research, but to figure out how to determine if the information you are reading is actually worth your time. Doing so requires following a few simple steps to determine if you’re getting your information from a valid source.

Understand the Source of Information

First and foremost, try to figure exactly from where the information comes from. Any information that comes from social media should be treated with at least a bit of suspicion. When you read a statement, start by figuring out if it comes from a health professional or from a published study. This will give you an idea of whether or not what you’re reading can be backed up by any actual medical science.

If the information does include a source, try to look at that source. Don’t be fooled by professional-sounding names – look into the organization that sponsored the information and try to determine if they have any biases. Many sources that peddle inaccurate information do so successfully because they have names that seem trustworthy, so check out their websites to see if they are legitimate.

Talk to Your Pediatrician

It’s also a good idea to think about the biases of the source of your information. Is this source usually trustworthy? Is it a source that generally has good medical information? Is this a source that is trying to sell you something or to convince you of something else? You need to ask all of these questions before you can commit to trusting the information from any source.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, take the time to discuss any information you find with your child’s pediatrician. Don’t go in with the idea that the doctor is trying to trick you – after all, he or she has a vested interest in keeping your child safe. Simply present the information to the doctor and see what he or she has to say. You might be surprised by how willing a doctor will be to help you with any medical concerns that you might present.

21Jun2021

It’s always important for a parent to be able to talk to his or her child’s physician. Doing so isn’t always easy, though, especially if you find yourself intimidated by the idea of talking with an expert about your child’s health. Taking the time to learn how to talk to a doctor is always a good idea, and following the steps below can help you to have a better relationship with your child’s pediatrician.

Be Direct

One of the biggest hurdles in talking to your child’s doctor is not ensuring that he or she knows that you want to talk about something. When you schedule an appointment for your child, make sure that you’re direct with the doctor about your concerns when he or she is in the room. It’s always better to talk to the pediatrician face-to-face and to be able to address things directly rather than waiting until later.

Be Specific

It’s also a good idea to bring as much specific information to your discussions as possible. If you feel like your child isn’t sleeping well, for example, you might want to specifically state about how often your child is waking up every night and how long it has been since your child has gotten a good night’s sleep. Your child’s doctor certainly doesn’t expect you to come in with a diagnosis, but he or she can always work better when he or she has more actionable information with which to work.

Remember, You Are a Team

Maybe the most important thing to remember, though, is that you and the child’s doctor are on the same team. Even if you don’t agree with him or her, you’re both working to make sure that your child is in the best possible health. As such, it’s always good to go in with the attitude that the two of you are going to work together and that your doctor’s advice is always in the interest of helping your child.