Posts Tagged "Vaccination"

20Sep2022

Cold and flu season is just around the corner, and you want to keep your child as safe from these illnesses as possible. While it seems impossible to fully avoid the cold or flu, it is still important to take the steps to minimize your child’s risk of catching either illness. You can protect your child during cold and flu season with these tips.

Maintain Your Child’s Health

First, you want to ensure your child is leading a healthy lifestyle. Your child needs a well-balanced diet to get the nutrients they need to strengthen their immune system. You can also boost their immune system by making sure they get regular exercise and nine to 14 hours of sleep each night.

Stay On Top Of The Flu Vaccine

If your child is six months or older, talk to their pediatrician about the flu vaccine. This vaccine can help them build up immunity to fight off the flu virus. It should be noted that your child may still catch a cold or another strain of the flu, so it is important to take other precautions as well.

Make Hand-Washing A Habit

It is easy to spread germs when children touch everything, so you need to make hand-washing a habit for your child. They should especially wash their hands after touching shared items and playground equipment. You also want to ensure they wash their hands before each meal. If they cannot get to a sink, encourage them to use hand sanitizer or hand wipes until they can wash their hands.

Teach Your Children Good Hygiene

Now is the time to ensure your child knows how to practice good hygiene. Teach them to sneeze or cough into their sleeve to prevent the spread of germs. This way, your child is doing their part to keep the cold and flu at bay. The more people who cover when coughing or sneezing, the less likely they are to spread germs to others.

Keep Them Home When Sick

If your child does become sick, be sure to keep them home from school and other activities. You do not want your child to spread their cold or flu to others. In addition, you do not want to risk them feeling worse after they get home. Once again, the risk of germs spreading lowers when everyone takes precautions when they are sick.

Whether your child is under the weather or you need to schedule a flu vaccine, Kids 1st Pediatrics offers the care your child needs. You can schedule an appointment at kids1stpediatrics.net.

24Sep2021

COVID-19 continues to be an ongoing issue across the world, with vaccination becoming a hot topic among many groups. As a parent, you do owe it to your child to have a frank discussion about what the vaccine may mean for him or her, and you’ll need to be able to answer any questions that your child may have. Fortunately, doing so is really a matter of being able to find the correct information.

Providing Your Child with Valuable Information

The beginning of your discussion should always start with a frank discussion of what the vaccine is and is not. If you’re not sure about the definition of a vaccine, it’s absolutely fine to look it up and learn a bit more yourself. From there, you can explain to your child that the vaccine is much like those he or she already received for school – not a cure for an illness, but rather protection from contracting the illness itself. You can talk to your child about the risks that are still present even if he or she is vaccinated and, if appropriate, what you consider the risks of vaccination might be.

It’s vital that you present accurate information to your child, so use this time to work together. Ignore social media and stick to well-regarded, peer-reviewed journals or to public health websites that break down the information from those sources. This will not only help your child learn a bit more about the vaccination process but also about how to look up credible sources for health information in the future.

Don’t think that you have to do this all alone, though. You can and should involve your child’s pediatrician in this discussion. Not only will this allow you to bring a more authoritative source into the conversation, but it will also give you a chance to ask the questions to which you might not be able to find satisfying answers online.

12Jul2021

One of the most commonly asked questions by any child going to the doctor is whether or not he or she will get a shot. Though as adults we all know that properly administered shots really don’t hurt, many children have at least a mild phobia of getting shots even if they’ve successfully gotten them in the past. As a parent, it’s often good to have a basic strategy to help your child deal with this fear on the way to his or her next doctor’s appointment.

Effectively Explaining Shots to Your Child

It’s never a good idea to lie to your child about whether or not he or she will get a shot at a doctor’s appointment. If you know that he or she will get a shot, tell him or her. If not, be honest and say that you don’t know whether or not a shot will be given. While this might not necessarily assuage your child’s fears, it will help you to build a better bond of trust. This will help lessen your child’s fears of future doctor’s appointments.

It’s likewise vital not to build up a shot as anything more than a standard procedure. Never use it as a threat to scare a child, and never try to downplay what’s going on. If your child asks you whether or not a shot will hurt, be honest – compare it to other mild discomforts that your child has experienced and make sure that he or she knows that the pain will be brief.

Finally, make sure that you praise your child after the shot has been given. Don’t focus on what he or she might have done wrong, but rather on the fact that he or she made it through. Your child will be much more likely to remember how you responded to him or her getting a shot than he or she will be to remember getting the shot in the first place.

20Oct2020

Protecting your child from influenza is important every year but is even more important this year with the added concerns of COVID-19 still swirling across the United States. Those who are already sick with influenza may find it even more difficult to fend off a COVID-19 infection and could end up with more serious health concerns. Additionally, it is important to decrease as much work for medical teams around the country as possible to free up resources for fighting the novel coronavirus. Here are a few ways that you can protect your child this fall and winter.

First and most importantly, be sure that your child receives an influenza vaccine.

October is an excellent month to get this shot as it should last through the rest of the influenza season. However, even if your child does not get the shot this month, your doctor will still be able to give it in later months. According to the CDC, very young children, especially those younger than 5, are at high risk of developing serious complications should they develop influenza. Your child can receive an immunization as long as he is at least six months old.

Second, you can still take numerous steps to prevent an outbreak of influenza in your family even after family members get the influenza vaccine.

Stay away from sick family members and friends, and stay at home yourself if you are feeling under the weather.

Teach your child to cover his coughs and sneezes with a tissue or his arm. Tell him to wash his hands for at least 30 seconds after blowing his nose. Singing Happy Birthday while washing up can be an easy way to measure the correct amount of time.

Although it can be difficult for children to keep their hands away from their faces, it is vitally important for reducing the spread of germs. In particular, encourage them to stop rubbing their eyes.

Finally, be sure to keep frequently touched surfaces in your home clean and disinfected at all times.

This is particularly important if someone in your family is sick, but it should be done regularly even when you all are healthy. Use disinfecting wipes or sprays to clean doorknobs, light switches, countertops, and faucet handles.

If your child still needs an influenza vaccine this season, contact Kids 1st Pediatrics to set up an appointment time.

21Dec2019

With winter right around the corner, it is time for parents across the community to prepare for wintertime illnesses. When your child suddenly comes home from school with a sore throat, muscle aches, or stomach pain, you want to know what he is fighting so that you can treat it properly.

Common Cold

It is nearly a given that your child will come down with a cold this winter as most children get up to 10 colds every year. Because this is a virus with typically mild symptoms, your child will most likely not need to see a doctor unless the illness worsens. However, he will need plenty of liquids and may need medication to bring down a fever.

Influenza

Although influenza is less common than a cold, almost half of children contract it each year. It is set apart from colds by the high fever, chills, and body aches that accompany it. Children over the age of 6 months should have the influenza vaccination every year. Most children who catch this illness can get over it on their own.

Stomach Flu

This illness may be called the flu but is correctly labeled as gastroenteritis. Most children with gastroenteritis have a stomachache along with nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea for 24 to 48 hours. Hydration is vital.

Strep Throat

If your child has strep throat, he will have a very sore throat along with a fever, stomach pain, and difficulty swallowing. However, he will not have a runny nose. A simple throat swab from your pediatrician ensures that the illness is correctly diagnosed and treated with antibiotics.

Ear Infection

Many very young children end up with ear infections and spend time rubbing or pulling at their ears. If your child has a fever along with these symptoms, some acetaminophen or ibuprofen should limit the discomfort. If symptoms do not resolve in a few days, you should visit your pediatrician for professional help.

Whooping Cough

Although less common these days than it once was, whooping cough seems to be making a bit of a comeback in recent years. Initially, symptoms feel like a common cold but will progress to a terrible cough during which your child makes a whooping sound.

Be sure to contact Kids 1st Pediatrics to set up an appointment time for the influenza vaccine or to request a same-day or next-day appointment for your child.