Posts Tagged "Immune System"

20Sep2022

Cold and flu season is just around the corner, and you want to keep your child as safe from these illnesses as possible. While it seems impossible to fully avoid the cold or flu, it is still important to take the steps to minimize your child’s risk of catching either illness. You can protect your child during cold and flu season with these tips.

Maintain Your Child’s Health

First, you want to ensure your child is leading a healthy lifestyle. Your child needs a well-balanced diet to get the nutrients they need to strengthen their immune system. You can also boost their immune system by making sure they get regular exercise and nine to 14 hours of sleep each night.

Stay On Top Of The Flu Vaccine

If your child is six months or older, talk to their pediatrician about the flu vaccine. This vaccine can help them build up immunity to fight off the flu virus. It should be noted that your child may still catch a cold or another strain of the flu, so it is important to take other precautions as well.

Make Hand-Washing A Habit

It is easy to spread germs when children touch everything, so you need to make hand-washing a habit for your child. They should especially wash their hands after touching shared items and playground equipment. You also want to ensure they wash their hands before each meal. If they cannot get to a sink, encourage them to use hand sanitizer or hand wipes until they can wash their hands.

Teach Your Children Good Hygiene

Now is the time to ensure your child knows how to practice good hygiene. Teach them to sneeze or cough into their sleeve to prevent the spread of germs. This way, your child is doing their part to keep the cold and flu at bay. The more people who cover when coughing or sneezing, the less likely they are to spread germs to others.

Keep Them Home When Sick

If your child does become sick, be sure to keep them home from school and other activities. You do not want your child to spread their cold or flu to others. In addition, you do not want to risk them feeling worse after they get home. Once again, the risk of germs spreading lowers when everyone takes precautions when they are sick.

Whether your child is under the weather or you need to schedule a flu vaccine, Kids 1st Pediatrics offers the care your child needs. You can schedule an appointment at kids1stpediatrics.net.

15Oct2021

As the seasons change from summer to autumn, many children begin to get the first sniffles of the year. While you might have easily been able to write this off in the past, the continued prevalence of COVID-19 has made even what might have once been an inconsequential cough seem overly threatening. As such, it’s incredibly important to know how to deal with something like the common cold in times of more heightened scrutiny.

Understanding the Symptoms

The first and perhaps most important thing you’ll need to know how to do is to separate out symptoms of the common cold from COVID symptoms. While some of the symptoms, like a cough or even a mild fever, might be present in both, there are other symptoms that are relatively unique to COVID. For example, any loss of a child’s sense of smell or taste is usually a good sign that a test is needed, as are stomach problems like diarrhea. Respiratory issues are also an issue, as you’ll want to seek care if your child is having trouble breathing even if they aren’t positive for COVID-19.

It’s also generally a better idea to be safe than to be sorry. If you think that your child’s cold is more than just a cold, keep them home even if they don’t seem to have serious symptoms. If the symptoms persist or get worse, call your pediatrician to get guidance. In many cases, your pediatrician will suggest that you get your child tested.

One of the toughest things to deal with is the fact that the common cold is just as likely to occur as it ever was. Unfortunately, this means that you’re going to have to deal with many false alarms during this cold and flu season, but that’s just the nature of the world today. As long as you’re careful and consult with your doctor as necessary, you can help to safeguard your child’s health.

8Oct2021

If you’ve ever spent time watching television, you’ve almost certainly come across ads that ask you to talk to your doctor about some type of medication. While this might be a tough thing to do for the average person, it can feel even more challenging if you are doing so on behalf of your child. Luckily, it’s usually simple to talk to your pediatrician about your concerns.

The Important Factors to Discuss with Pediatricians

It’s always best to go into a conversation about medication with a pediatrician with the goal of solving a problem rather than talking about a specific medication. If you’ve noticed a drug that is advertised to help your child with a particular type of illness, for example, the best way to start the conversation with your doctor is to talk about how you can better manage that illness. Talking about medication is usually a logical follow-up question to that.

You may also want to spend some time doing some research on your own before you talk to your doctor. While pediatricians do a great deal of research on their own, being able to bring up specific concerns or points of interest can be a great way to help your doctor get a bit more information about your child’s needs. The more you’re able to bring to the table in this conversation, the better.

Don’t be afraid to talk to your child’s pediatrician if you have concerns about medication. You may be able to not only get more information about the medication in question, but you may also be able to work with your pediatrician to find a way to better manage your child’s condition. In addition, if you’re willing to start the conversation, your pediatrician may be able to find a suitable course of action that can help your child to live a better life regardless of what they end up being prescribed.

24Sep2021

COVID-19 continues to be an ongoing issue across the world, with vaccination becoming a hot topic among many groups. As a parent, you do owe it to your child to have a frank discussion about what the vaccine may mean for him or her, and you’ll need to be able to answer any questions that your child may have. Fortunately, doing so is really a matter of being able to find the correct information.

Providing Your Child with Valuable Information

The beginning of your discussion should always start with a frank discussion of what the vaccine is and is not. If you’re not sure about the definition of a vaccine, it’s absolutely fine to look it up and learn a bit more yourself. From there, you can explain to your child that the vaccine is much like those he or she already received for school – not a cure for an illness, but rather protection from contracting the illness itself. You can talk to your child about the risks that are still present even if he or she is vaccinated and, if appropriate, what you consider the risks of vaccination might be.

It’s vital that you present accurate information to your child, so use this time to work together. Ignore social media and stick to well-regarded, peer-reviewed journals or to public health websites that break down the information from those sources. This will not only help your child learn a bit more about the vaccination process but also about how to look up credible sources for health information in the future.

Don’t think that you have to do this all alone, though. You can and should involve your child’s pediatrician in this discussion. Not only will this allow you to bring a more authoritative source into the conversation, but it will also give you a chance to ask the questions to which you might not be able to find satisfying answers online.

12Jul2021

One of the most commonly asked questions by any child going to the doctor is whether or not he or she will get a shot. Though as adults we all know that properly administered shots really don’t hurt, many children have at least a mild phobia of getting shots even if they’ve successfully gotten them in the past. As a parent, it’s often good to have a basic strategy to help your child deal with this fear on the way to his or her next doctor’s appointment.

Effectively Explaining Shots to Your Child

It’s never a good idea to lie to your child about whether or not he or she will get a shot at a doctor’s appointment. If you know that he or she will get a shot, tell him or her. If not, be honest and say that you don’t know whether or not a shot will be given. While this might not necessarily assuage your child’s fears, it will help you to build a better bond of trust. This will help lessen your child’s fears of future doctor’s appointments.

It’s likewise vital not to build up a shot as anything more than a standard procedure. Never use it as a threat to scare a child, and never try to downplay what’s going on. If your child asks you whether or not a shot will hurt, be honest – compare it to other mild discomforts that your child has experienced and make sure that he or she knows that the pain will be brief.

Finally, make sure that you praise your child after the shot has been given. Don’t focus on what he or she might have done wrong, but rather on the fact that he or she made it through. Your child will be much more likely to remember how you responded to him or her getting a shot than he or she will be to remember getting the shot in the first place.