Posts Tagged "Immune System"

15Oct2021

As the seasons change from summer to autumn, many children begin to get the first sniffles of the year. While you might have easily been able to write this off in the past, the continued prevalence of COVID-19 has made even what might have once been an inconsequential cough seem overly threatening. As such, it’s incredibly important to know how to deal with something like the common cold in times of more heightened scrutiny.

Understanding the Symptoms

The first and perhaps most important thing you’ll need to know how to do is to separate out symptoms of the common cold from COVID symptoms. While some of the symptoms, like a cough or even a mild fever, might be present in both, there are other symptoms that are relatively unique to COVID. For example, any loss of a child’s sense of smell or taste is usually a good sign that a test is needed, as are stomach problems like diarrhea. Respiratory issues are also an issue, as you’ll want to seek care if your child is having trouble breathing even if they aren’t positive for COVID-19.

It’s also generally a better idea to be safe than to be sorry. If you think that your child’s cold is more than just a cold, keep them home even if they don’t seem to have serious symptoms. If the symptoms persist or get worse, call your pediatrician to get guidance. In many cases, your pediatrician will suggest that you get your child tested.

One of the toughest things to deal with is the fact that the common cold is just as likely to occur as it ever was. Unfortunately, this means that you’re going to have to deal with many false alarms during this cold and flu season, but that’s just the nature of the world today. As long as you’re careful and consult with your doctor as necessary, you can help to safeguard your child’s health.

8Oct2021

If you’ve ever spent time watching television, you’ve almost certainly come across ads that ask you to talk to your doctor about some type of medication. While this might be a tough thing to do for the average person, it can feel even more challenging if you are doing so on behalf of your child. Luckily, it’s usually simple to talk to your pediatrician about your concerns.

The Important Factors to Discuss with Pediatricians

It’s always best to go into a conversation about medication with a pediatrician with the goal of solving a problem rather than talking about a specific medication. If you’ve noticed a drug that is advertised to help your child with a particular type of illness, for example, the best way to start the conversation with your doctor is to talk about how you can better manage that illness. Talking about medication is usually a logical follow-up question to that.

You may also want to spend some time doing some research on your own before you talk to your doctor. While pediatricians do a great deal of research on their own, being able to bring up specific concerns or points of interest can be a great way to help your doctor get a bit more information about your child’s needs. The more you’re able to bring to the table in this conversation, the better.

Don’t be afraid to talk to your child’s pediatrician if you have concerns about medication. You may be able to not only get more information about the medication in question, but you may also be able to work with your pediatrician to find a way to better manage your child’s condition. In addition, if you’re willing to start the conversation, your pediatrician may be able to find a suitable course of action that can help your child to live a better life regardless of what they end up being prescribed.

24Sep2021

COVID-19 continues to be an ongoing issue across the world, with vaccination becoming a hot topic among many groups. As a parent, you do owe it to your child to have a frank discussion about what the vaccine may mean for him or her, and you’ll need to be able to answer any questions that your child may have. Fortunately, doing so is really a matter of being able to find the correct information.

Providing Your Child with Valuable Information

The beginning of your discussion should always start with a frank discussion of what the vaccine is and is not. If you’re not sure about the definition of a vaccine, it’s absolutely fine to look it up and learn a bit more yourself. From there, you can explain to your child that the vaccine is much like those he or she already received for school – not a cure for an illness, but rather protection from contracting the illness itself. You can talk to your child about the risks that are still present even if he or she is vaccinated and, if appropriate, what you consider the risks of vaccination might be.

It’s vital that you present accurate information to your child, so use this time to work together. Ignore social media and stick to well-regarded, peer-reviewed journals or to public health websites that break down the information from those sources. This will not only help your child learn a bit more about the vaccination process but also about how to look up credible sources for health information in the future.

Don’t think that you have to do this all alone, though. You can and should involve your child’s pediatrician in this discussion. Not only will this allow you to bring a more authoritative source into the conversation, but it will also give you a chance to ask the questions to which you might not be able to find satisfying answers online.

12Jul2021

One of the most commonly asked questions by any child going to the doctor is whether or not he or she will get a shot. Though as adults we all know that properly administered shots really don’t hurt, many children have at least a mild phobia of getting shots even if they’ve successfully gotten them in the past. As a parent, it’s often good to have a basic strategy to help your child deal with this fear on the way to his or her next doctor’s appointment.

Effectively Explaining Shots to Your Child

It’s never a good idea to lie to your child about whether or not he or she will get a shot at a doctor’s appointment. If you know that he or she will get a shot, tell him or her. If not, be honest and say that you don’t know whether or not a shot will be given. While this might not necessarily assuage your child’s fears, it will help you to build a better bond of trust. This will help lessen your child’s fears of future doctor’s appointments.

It’s likewise vital not to build up a shot as anything more than a standard procedure. Never use it as a threat to scare a child, and never try to downplay what’s going on. If your child asks you whether or not a shot will hurt, be honest – compare it to other mild discomforts that your child has experienced and make sure that he or she knows that the pain will be brief.

Finally, make sure that you praise your child after the shot has been given. Don’t focus on what he or she might have done wrong, but rather on the fact that he or she made it through. Your child will be much more likely to remember how you responded to him or her getting a shot than he or she will be to remember getting the shot in the first place.

16Apr2021

It is estimated that at least 6 million children in the United States have head lice every year. It is particularly common for infestations to happen in schools where kids spend a great deal of time together. If you find your child scratching at his head more than he usually does, you may be wondering whether lice should be a concern for you and how you should address this problem.

What Are Head Lice?

Head lice are tiny insects that only feed on human blood. Because lice do not have wings, they cannot fly long distances. Instead, they can only be passed from child to child through direct contact or through very close proximity.

How to Determine Whether Your Child Has Lice

Although frequent scratching of the scalp is a major symptom of head lice, an itchy scalp could be caused by other problems, such as psoriasis or even an allergic reaction. To determine whether lice are to blame, you will have to get close to the problem area to check for these tiny creatures. You should be able to see lice on the hair or even on the shoulders if they have fallen out of the hair. The tiny eggs, which are called nits, may be attached to individual strands of hair. Your child may also complain of a ticklish feeling on his scalp.

Choosing the Right Treatment for Head Lice

If you see tiny adult lice or nits in your child’s hair, you will most likely be able to treat the problem on your own in the comfort of your home. While treatment is time-intensive, it is quite effective when done correctly. There are several over-the-counter shampoos that you can use along with a fine-tooth comb to get rid of all the lice. If this does not take care of the problem completely, you should contact your child’s pediatrician for a topical or oral prescription medication because some lice have become resistant to the ingredients in over-the-counter shampoos.

Why You Should Not Let Head Lice Worry You

Although head lice is certainly an inconvenience and may mean that your child has to take some time off school, you should rest easy knowing that lice are not known disease carriers and that there are plenty of good treatments for the problem. Contact Kids 1st Pediatrics if you have any further questions.