Posts Tagged "Hospital"

5Nov2021

One of the hardest calls to make as a parent is figuring out when to call your child’s doctor. While it’s always a good idea to play it safe, many parents worry that they might end up bringing their children into the office for something that could have more easily been handled at home. If you’re trying to make such a decision, you’ll want to keep a few factors in mind.

Important Factors to Consider

The first thing to think about, of course, is the significance of what you are dealing with. A fever of below one hundred degrees, for example, probably isn’t worth going to the doctor for, nor is a small scrape or bruise. On the other hand, a problem that seems bigger – a higher, longer-duration fever or a significant injury – should almost automatically warrant a visit to the doctor’s office.

It’s also worth thinking about your child’s general health. There is a certain degree of normality for any given child when it comes to how he or she reacts to being sick, and you need to keep that in mind. It might be worth bringing a child in for what might be a low fever if he or she typically runs cool, for example, or you might not want to bring in a child who complains about a stomach ache if he or she is typically prone to those problems (and, of course, other issues have already been ruled out by your doctor).

Finally, try to remember that it’s always worth bringing your child in to see his or her doctor if you feel like something is just not right. While it’s not fair to say that a parent’s intuition is always going to pay off, you will have a greater peace of mind if you take your child in to see a doctor when you feel like doing so is appropriate. The worst you can find out is that your child didn’t need to come into the office, so the true risk of going in is relatively low compared to the risk of staying at home out of fear that you are over-reacting.

17Apr2020

If your family is similar to many others, your children may be going stir-crazy by now. Although the first few days off school may have filled them with joy, days, and weeks away from their friends during the coronavirus pandemic and a limit on the number of activities they can do may leave them feeling more like couch potatoes than ever. Now is the time to inspire your children to get up and find activities that they love. Not only is exercise good for physical health, but also it can significantly improve your children’s mental health during this stressful time.

Improve Strength and Physical Fitness

All kids need stronger bones and muscles. This will help them maintain lean, healthy bodies and will put them on the path to good habits early in life. They will also increase in endurance and be able to run farther and play longer.

Improve Heart and Lung Health

Children who exercise can lower their blood pressure just as adults do. They will also improve their lung capacity.

Improve Sleep

Children who exercise often feel more relaxed. They may be able to get to sleep faster, sleep longer, and have better sleep quality.

Improve Mood

The hormones released during exercise help decrease stress hormones while improving the feel-good hormones that lead to an improved mood.

Boost Confidence

Kids who are more physically fit feel good about themselves because of what they can do. They may have better self-image and be proud of their flexibility, strength, and endurance. This confidence may even translate into improved body image, better test scores, and improved social habits.

While these are the top benefits of exercise for children, you may find that your child can improve in many other areas as well. Now more than ever, it is vital that your children are getting the recommended amount of exercise every day. Do not let fear of coronavirus stop you from letting your children play on their own in the backyard, from taking a family walk or from biking on your quiet street. While you should not be letting your children play with all the other children on your street, you can use this time to bond as a family with special activities. Not only will you be helping your children build healthy habits for their bodies, but also you will be improving their emotional health.

28Mar2020

One of the biggest surprises for many parents is the requirement of tummy time for their infants. In their concerns over breastfeeding, sleep schedules, and developmental milestones, they may forget about the importance of daily time spent on the belly. This practice can actually help your baby develop properly.

What Are the Benefits of Tummy Time?

One of the most important benefits of tummy time is the overall physical strengthening effects for your baby. Your infant will learn how to lift his head and will develop strong muscles in his neck and upper back. In addition, this can lead to an improvement in gross motor skills, which can lead to an earlier development in the areas of rolling over, sitting, and crawling. In addition, getting your baby off his back for at least some of the day can prevent the flat head syndrome.

How Much Tummy Time Should Your Baby Have?

At first, your baby will probably not want to put up with much time on his tummy. In fact, you may find that he can only make it for five minutes or less before he begins crying. You may also find that you need to interact directly with your child for much of the time to keep him content. However, as your child becomes used to this time, you can increase tummy time length each day.

How Can You Get Started with Tummy Time?

It is best to start tummy time as early as possible because your baby will be quite resistant to it the older he is when starting the routine. Tummy time should happen once or twice per day at a minimum. However, as your baby gets used to this time, you may be able to encourage it after diaper changes or upon awakening from a nap.

Consider buying your child a special tummy time mat and pillow, which is perfectly sized for his tiny chest. This will also help him lift his neck and head off the floor to look around and better enjoy himself. You may also be able to use a breastfeeding pillow if you have one. As your child gets older, place age-appropriate toys near him to encourage motor skills and enjoyment.

Tummy time is an important part of every infant’s daily life. If you have further questions about how to get started, check with Kids 1st Pediatrics.

24Mar2020

Food allergies have become more problematic in recent years as increasing numbers of individuals are diagnosed with them. Even children are frequently diagnosed with food allergies, with 1 in 13 children currently having this issue. In addition, almost half of children with food allergies have more than one allergy. As a parent, here are a few helpful tips when it comes to guarding what your child eats.

What Are the Most Common Food Allergies in Children?

Although peanut allergies may be the first problem that pops into your mind when you hear about food allergies, there are actually numerous foods and food groups that can cause problems for the littlest members of your household. The following are the primary concerning foods for children.

  • Milk
  • Peanuts and tree nuts
  • Fish and shellfish
  • Wheat
  • Eggs
  • Soy

All of these ingredients must be disclosed on food packaging, which can help you in making food choices for your household.

What Symptoms Should Parents Look for with Food Allergies?

You should know that while some children may be genuinely allergic to some foods, others just have a sensitivity to it. While an allergy creates a strong response, such as hives or swelling in the throat that leads to difficulty breathing, a sensitivity will probably only lead to discomfort. Keep an eye out for any of the following distressing signs of an allergic reaction, and consider emergency medical treatment for those that are life-threatening.

  • Itchy skin and hives
  • Red, itchy eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness

How Can Food Allergies Be Treated?

In the case of a life-threatening condition, emergency medical personnel may provide an epinephrine shot, which can aid in breathing. Other than emergency circumstances, the best treatment for a food allergy is complete avoidance of the food. However, because your child is not always under your direct supervision, you will need to notify the school and other households where your child spends time about which foods are and are not safe.

Because this is just a basic look at food allergies in children, we recommend that you visit with your child’s pediatrician in more detail if you have any further concerns. Kids 1st Pediatrics is ready to help you with any of your concerns for your children from infancy through the teenage years.

24Feb2020

Childhood is the most important time to focus on bone health because 90 percent of one’s bone mass is in place by the time he is 20. If bones are not properly built during childhood, there may not be another good time to strengthen these vital cells. In fact, this could set up individuals for osteoporosis and dangerous fractures much later in life. If you are a parent, you should be aware of three key ways that you can affect your child’s health in this matter.

Give Children Plenty of Calcium and Vitamin D

Nutrition is a key component of good bone health. You probably remember hearing your mother reminding you to drink your milk for strong bones. This tip remains true today as milk and other dairy products are great sources of the important bone mineral known as calcium. Even if your child is not a big fan of dairy products, you can find plenty of calcium in many other common foods, such as leafy greens, fish, and nuts, as well as in calcium-fortified bread and juices.

You must also give vitamin D along with calcium because it helps the body absorb this necessary mineral. Vitamin D can be found in some types of fish, as well as in egg yolks and fortified milk. If your child does not get enough vitamin D in his diet, your doctor may recommend a supplement.

Encourage Physical Activity

Weight-bearing activities are important for growing not only strong muscles but also strong bones at any age. Sadly, many children get very little activity on most days of the week, leading to weak bones. Running, climbing, and jumping are all great activities at this age.

Keep Children Away from Secondhand Smoke

Cigarette smoke is a known cause of weak bones at any age. While you may not be concerned about this for your child because he most likely has never tried a cigarette, you should be aware that many people try cigarettes for the first time at a very young age. In addition, secondhand smoke can be just as dangerous for children to breathe.

While these tips can positively affect people of any age, they are particularly important for children who are actively growing new bone cells and especially for those in their teenage years. For more information, schedule an appointment at Kids 1st Pediatrics today.