Posts Tagged "Physician"

5Nov2021

One of the hardest calls to make as a parent is figuring out when to call your child’s doctor. While it’s always a good idea to play it safe, many parents worry that they might end up bringing their children into the office for something that could have more easily been handled at home. If you’re trying to make such a decision, you’ll want to keep a few factors in mind.

Important Factors to Consider

The first thing to think about, of course, is the significance of what you are dealing with. A fever of below one hundred degrees, for example, probably isn’t worth going to the doctor for, nor is a small scrape or bruise. On the other hand, a problem that seems bigger – a higher, longer-duration fever or a significant injury – should almost automatically warrant a visit to the doctor’s office.

It’s also worth thinking about your child’s general health. There is a certain degree of normality for any given child when it comes to how he or she reacts to being sick, and you need to keep that in mind. It might be worth bringing a child in for what might be a low fever if he or she typically runs cool, for example, or you might not want to bring in a child who complains about a stomach ache if he or she is typically prone to those problems (and, of course, other issues have already been ruled out by your doctor).

Finally, try to remember that it’s always worth bringing your child in to see his or her doctor if you feel like something is just not right. While it’s not fair to say that a parent’s intuition is always going to pay off, you will have a greater peace of mind if you take your child in to see a doctor when you feel like doing so is appropriate. The worst you can find out is that your child didn’t need to come into the office, so the true risk of going in is relatively low compared to the risk of staying at home out of fear that you are over-reacting.

8Oct2021

If you’ve ever spent time watching television, you’ve almost certainly come across ads that ask you to talk to your doctor about some type of medication. While this might be a tough thing to do for the average person, it can feel even more challenging if you are doing so on behalf of your child. Luckily, it’s usually simple to talk to your pediatrician about your concerns.

The Important Factors to Discuss with Pediatricians

It’s always best to go into a conversation about medication with a pediatrician with the goal of solving a problem rather than talking about a specific medication. If you’ve noticed a drug that is advertised to help your child with a particular type of illness, for example, the best way to start the conversation with your doctor is to talk about how you can better manage that illness. Talking about medication is usually a logical follow-up question to that.

You may also want to spend some time doing some research on your own before you talk to your doctor. While pediatricians do a great deal of research on their own, being able to bring up specific concerns or points of interest can be a great way to help your doctor get a bit more information about your child’s needs. The more you’re able to bring to the table in this conversation, the better.

Don’t be afraid to talk to your child’s pediatrician if you have concerns about medication. You may be able to not only get more information about the medication in question, but you may also be able to work with your pediatrician to find a way to better manage your child’s condition. In addition, if you’re willing to start the conversation, your pediatrician may be able to find a suitable course of action that can help your child to live a better life regardless of what they end up being prescribed.

21Jun2021

It’s always important for a parent to be able to talk to his or her child’s physician. Doing so isn’t always easy, though, especially if you find yourself intimidated by the idea of talking with an expert about your child’s health. Taking the time to learn how to talk to a doctor is always a good idea, and following the steps below can help you to have a better relationship with your child’s pediatrician.

Be Direct

One of the biggest hurdles in talking to your child’s doctor is not ensuring that he or she knows that you want to talk about something. When you schedule an appointment for your child, make sure that you’re direct with the doctor about your concerns when he or she is in the room. It’s always better to talk to the pediatrician face-to-face and to be able to address things directly rather than waiting until later.

Be Specific

It’s also a good idea to bring as much specific information to your discussions as possible. If you feel like your child isn’t sleeping well, for example, you might want to specifically state about how often your child is waking up every night and how long it has been since your child has gotten a good night’s sleep. Your child’s doctor certainly doesn’t expect you to come in with a diagnosis, but he or she can always work better when he or she has more actionable information with which to work.

Remember, You Are a Team

Maybe the most important thing to remember, though, is that you and the child’s doctor are on the same team. Even if you don’t agree with him or her, you’re both working to make sure that your child is in the best possible health. As such, it’s always good to go in with the attitude that the two of you are going to work together and that your doctor’s advice is always in the interest of helping your child.

3May2021

Many children are afraid to visit the doctor. This can be a fear of the unknown in some and a result of bad interactions in the past for others, but this kind of fear is distressingly common. As a parent, though, your goal is to help your child get past this fear. In many cases, the best way to do so is to make sure that you have honest conversations with your child about going to see his or her pediatrician.

Helping Children Understand What Doctors Do

The best place to start is to familiarize your child with what happens at the doctor. Let him or her ask you questions, and don’t be afraid to answer honestly. You obviously don’t need to get too technical with the answers, but you should be as honest as you can. Make sure that you always preface your information with the fact that everything that happens at the doctor’s office is done to help your child stay healthy.

It’s also a good idea to let your child express any fears he or she has. If he or she is afraid of being alone, for example, let him or her know that you’re going to be there. If your child is afraid of a shot, remind your child that the shot won’t hurt and that it will be over quickly. Anything you can do to acknowledge your child’s fears but to turn them into positives is a good thing.

Don’t be afraid to let your child know that going to the doctor is a normal part of life

Don’t be afraid to let your child know that going to the doctor is a normal part of life. Make it part of a bigger day out if you can, but consider adding a reward for going if your child absolutely can’t handle going otherwise. Sometimes that small bit of positive reinforcement is all that it will take to get your child into the doctor’s office willingly.

20Oct2020

Protecting your child from influenza is important every year but is even more important this year with the added concerns of COVID-19 still swirling across the United States. Those who are already sick with influenza may find it even more difficult to fend off a COVID-19 infection and could end up with more serious health concerns. Additionally, it is important to decrease as much work for medical teams around the country as possible to free up resources for fighting the novel coronavirus. Here are a few ways that you can protect your child this fall and winter.

First and most importantly, be sure that your child receives an influenza vaccine.

October is an excellent month to get this shot as it should last through the rest of the influenza season. However, even if your child does not get the shot this month, your doctor will still be able to give it in later months. According to the CDC, very young children, especially those younger than 5, are at high risk of developing serious complications should they develop influenza. Your child can receive an immunization as long as he is at least six months old.

Second, you can still take numerous steps to prevent an outbreak of influenza in your family even after family members get the influenza vaccine.

Stay away from sick family members and friends, and stay at home yourself if you are feeling under the weather.

Teach your child to cover his coughs and sneezes with a tissue or his arm. Tell him to wash his hands for at least 30 seconds after blowing his nose. Singing Happy Birthday while washing up can be an easy way to measure the correct amount of time.

Although it can be difficult for children to keep their hands away from their faces, it is vitally important for reducing the spread of germs. In particular, encourage them to stop rubbing their eyes.

Finally, be sure to keep frequently touched surfaces in your home clean and disinfected at all times.

This is particularly important if someone in your family is sick, but it should be done regularly even when you all are healthy. Use disinfecting wipes or sprays to clean doorknobs, light switches, countertops, and faucet handles.

If your child still needs an influenza vaccine this season, contact Kids 1st Pediatrics to set up an appointment time.